Breaking down the Common Core’s 8 mathematical practice standards - TeacherStep (2024)

The Common Core mathematical practice standards are the foundation for mathematical thinking and practice for students as well as guidance that helps teachers modify their classrooms to approach teaching in a way that develops a more advanced mathematical understanding. Think of these standards as a guide to creating a more complex and absorbing learning experience that can be applied to everyday life, instead of being left in the classroom.

1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them

The first Common Core mathematical practice standard is found in almost every math problem across the board. It means that students must understand the problem, figure out how to solve it, and then work until it is finished. Common Core standards encourage students to work with their current knowledge bank and apply the skills they already have while evaluating themselves in problem-solving. This standard is easily tested using problems with a tougher skill level than already mastered. While students work through more difficult problems, they focus on the process of solving the problem instead of just getting to the correct answer.

2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively

When trying to problem solve, it is important that students understand there are multiple ways to break apart the problem in order to find the solution. Using symbols, pictures or other representations to describe the different sections of the problem will allow students to use context skills rather than standard algorithms.

3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others

This standard is aimed at creating a common mathematical language that can be used to discuss and explain math as well as support or object others’ work. Math vocabulary is easily integrated into daily lesson plans in order for students to be able to communicate effectively. “Talk moves” are important in developing and building communication skills and can include such simple tasks as restating a fellow classmate’s reasoning or even supporting their own reason for agreeing or disagreeing. Prompting students to participate further in class mathematical discussion will help build student communication skills.

4. Model with mathematics

Math doesn’t end at the classroom door. Learning to model with mathematics means that students will use math skills to problem-solve real world situations. This can range from organizing different types of data to using math to help understand life connections. Using real world situations to show how math can be used in many different aspects of life helps math to be relevant outside of math class.

5. Use appropriate tools strategically

One of the Common Core’s biggest components is to provide students with the assets they need to navigate the real world. In order for students to learn what tools should be used in problem solving it is important to remember that no one will be guiding students through the real world – telling them which mathematics tool to use. By leaving the problem open ended, students can select which math tools to use and discuss what worked and what didn’t.

6. Attend to precision

Math, like other subjects, involves precision and exact answers. When speaking and problem-solving in math, exactness and attention to detail is important because a misstep or inaccurate answer in math can be translated to affect greater problem-solving in the real world. The importance in this step comes in the speaking demeanor of students to explain what is understood and what isn’t. This is confusing to me.

7. Look for and make use of structure

When students can identify different strategies for problem solving, they can use many different skills to determine the answer. Identifying similar patterns in mathematics can be used to solve problems that are out of their learning comfort zone. Repeated reasoning helps bring structure to more complex problems that might be able to be solved using multiple tools when the problem is broken apart into separate parts.

8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning

In mathematics, it is easy to forget the big picture while working on the details of the problem. In order for students to understand how a problem can be applied to other problems, they should work on applying their mathematical reasoning to various situations and problems. If a student can solve one problem the way it was taught, it is important that they also can relay that problem-solving technique to other problems.

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Breaking down the Common Core’s 8 mathematical practice standards - TeacherStep (2024)

FAQs

Breaking down the Common Core’s 8 mathematical practice standards - TeacherStep? ›

In Grade 8, instructional time should focus on three critical areas: (1) formulating and reasoning about expressions and equations, including modeling an association in bivariate data with a linear equation, and solving linear equations and systems of linear equations; (2) grasping the concept of a function and using ...

What are the 8 mathematical practices in Common Core? ›

Common Core Standards for Mathematical Practices
  • Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
  • Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.
  • Model with mathematics.
  • Use appropriate tools strategically.
  • Attend to precision.

What is Common Core math 8? ›

In Grade 8, instructional time should focus on three critical areas: (1) formulating and reasoning about expressions and equations, including modeling an association in bivariate data with a linear equation, and solving linear equations and systems of linear equations; (2) grasping the concept of a function and using ...

Why is Common Core bad? ›

Common Core was not benchmarked to international high-achieving countries despite claiming that this was so; Common Core standards were less clear than the California 1997 standards; Common Core had significant gaps in its content coverage; and, perhaps most obviously, despite its explicit promise to expect algebra and ...

How to implement standards of mathematical practice? ›

Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

Interpret and make meaning of the problem looking for starting points. Analyze what is given to explain to themselves the meaning of the problem. Plan a solution pathway instead of jumping to a solution. Monitor the progress and change the approach if necessary.

What is a Common Core math example? ›

Common core math example, Express the calculation “add 2 and 7, then multiply it by 5,” so this equation in standard mathematical form can be written as 5× (2+7) = 45. You need to understand the question correctly as it says 5× (2+7) is five times as large as 2+7 without calculating the sum or the product.

What is the difference between Common Core math and regular math? ›

While traditional math teaching strategies focus extensively on formula memorization and topic-specific learning patterns, Common Core works to give your student a deeper level of knowledge by introducing broader, more foundational methods of thinking as well as strategies that align with a more in-depth learning ...

Why are people against Common Core math? ›

Conversely, measures have also been said to take away from top-performing students. Many teachers also argue that the Common Core Math standards are not tailored to meet the needs of learners from different age groups, with some aspects being too advanced for younger learners.

What is the controversy with the Common Core? ›

Many people were/are concerned that the adoption of the Common Core might give too much power to the federal government. Dulls learning. Because so much emphasis is put on the acquisition of skills, the concern is that the joy of learning (which comes from more varied learning experiences) would be diminished.

What is the difference between the mathematical practice standards and the mathematical content standards? ›

Content standards describe the knowledge that a student must be able to recall and understand; process/practice standards provide an opportunity for students to demonstrate the skill using what they know. Simply put, content is what you know while process/practice is what can you do. They are both assessed differently.

What are the five process standards in math? ›

They were based on five key areas 1) Representation, 2) Reasoning and Proof, 3) Communication, 4) Problem Solving, and 5) Connections. If these look familiar, it is because they are the five process standards from the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM, 2000).

Why use mathematical practices? ›

Precision with calculation increases as students develop and refine strategies for efficient computation as well as a sense of reasonableness. Communicating precisely means that students use mathematics terms correctly. It also means that they communicate precise solutions noting correct units of measure.

What are the 8 math language routines? ›

ELL Mathematical Language Routines
  • MLR1: Stronger and Clearer Each Time. ...
  • MLR2: Collect and Display. ...
  • MLR3: Clarify, Critique, Correct. ...
  • MLR4: Information Gap. ...
  • MLR5: Co-Craft Questions. ...
  • MLR6: Three Reads. ...
  • MLR7: Compare and Connect. ...
  • MLR8: Discussion Supports.

What are the mathematical principles Common Core? ›

  • 1 Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. ...
  • 2 Reason abstractly and quantitatively. ...
  • 3 Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others. ...
  • 4 Model with mathematics. ...
  • 5 Use appropriate tools strategically. ...
  • 6 Attend to precision. ...
  • 7 Look for and make use of structure.

What are the NCTM mathematical practices? ›

Take a deeper dive into understanding the five practices—anticipating, monitoring, selecting, sequencing, and connecting—for facilitating productive mathematical conversations in your high school classrooms... read more. Enhance your fluency in the five practices—anticipating, monitoring, selecting, ... read more.

How many mathematical practices are there? ›

At the FMA we are working to develop Mathematicians by focusing on the 8 Mathematical Practice Standards: Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. Reason abstractly and quantitatively. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.

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